Fallout: The aftermath of nuclear war

So many of us love Fallout. This post-apocalyptic series of games—which began way back in 1997 with the PC’s Fallout: A Post-Nuclear Role Playing Game (if you want to use the full title), before many players now had even heard of it—features several sci-fi RPGs, with the most recent entry being spinoff game Fallout 76. The games take place in an alternate history in which the transistor was developed 120 years after its real-life creation (that would be 1947 here on our world)—with the result that atomic physics and vacuum-based tech became majorly important—and in which the culture of the fifties survived well into the 2000s.

The games focus on different parts of the US—Texas, West Virginia, and (in the case of Fallout 4) the East Coast—as they are affected by the aftereffects of nuclear war. In the case of all the games, the war, named the Great War (like World War I was before there was a World War II) began on October 23, 2077, when either China or the US fired missiles at their adversary.

No one knows who launched the first blow, but the damage is done: from that point on, nuclear war is the name of the game, and the landscape is soon destroyed. Despite this, humanity survives, not just in sparsely scattered shelters, but also thanks to the Vaults, which are underground bunkers built by Vault-Tec, a for-profit corporation. The Vaults have secrets, however—and players get caught up in all of these secrets as they play through the series.

The games are known for their open-world, sandbox style of gameplay, which allows players to explore very large swathes of land (and underground) as they go throughout their journeys and complete the main quest.

Fallout 4: an amazing entry to the series

Out of the Fallout games, in particular, so many of us love Fallout 4 because of its amazing Mods and Fallout 4 console commands. The open-world RPG by Bethesda—the fourth main game in the Fallout franchise—was released in November 2015 and has been loved all over the world since then.

Indeed, what’s not to love about its post-apocalyptic, post-nuclear-war versions of Boston and Massachusetts? Also very well-done in the game is the journey of the Sole Survivor, who sets out on a journey that involves exploring this post-apocalyptic wasteland in search of their son, who was kidnapped, after having been in cryogenic stasis for more than two hundred years. And that’s not even counting the murder of their spouse, which happened at the same time… Our poor Sole Survivor is in for a wild ride.

This wild ride takes place in the year 2287, following a disastrous nuclear war that basically destroyed much of the US. What was once familiar, suburban, and even fairly white-picket—that is to say, you (the Sole Survivor), your spousem and your baby son in the town of Sanctuary Hills, Massachusetts—has now become destroyed, barren, and very much a wasteland, thanks to the release of missiles as part of the US-against-China nuclear war.

It’s your job to traverse this wasteland in search of your son (who has come to the future with your family, only to have been kidnapped shortly after the three of you woke up)—gathering items, building settlements, and helping out different factions achieve various goals. You can craft your own armor, upgrade your weapons, and create cool housing for your character.

Extend the Fallout 4 experience with player-created mods

But beyond all of this, perhaps what’s even more interesting about this game is the amount of player interaction that it allows, specifically in the form of mods. Mods, in case you didn’t know, are player-developed extensions to games, which can include anything from improved visuals and different textures to new characters, new quests, and even new areas to explore.

Although lots and lots of games have mods, some of the most famous ones are compatible with Minecraft (expect new texture packs galore, as well as new skins to change your character’s green outfit), The Sims games, and the Smash Bros. (where you can add different characters, even ones not by Nintendo…or make the female characters have gigantic boobs).

One of the most famous mods of all time is Garry’s Mod, which was originally a mod for Half-Life 2, but was released as its own game in 2006. Garry’s Mod isn’t the only one that has been sanctioned by official game devs: other mods that were officially integrated into the canon games include Beyond the Sword for Civilization IV and Vermintide 1 & 2 for the Warhammer franchise. Also of note is Hyrule: Total Conquest, UndyingNephalim complete remake of the real-time strategy game 0 A.D. with the characters and worldbuilding of The Legend of Zelda.

So what about Fallout 4 mods? Well, in the almost-three years that have passed since that worldwide November release, players and gamers have created all kinds of mods for the game’s three systems of PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. Together, their mods will allow you to better develop your settlements; change the seasons, textures, and atmospheres; modify your crafting abilities; more efficiently decorate your shelter; and enjoy new, fan-developed content, including new quests and areas to explore.

If you’re interested in these kinds of Fallout 4 mods, then you’re in the right place. We’ve compiled a list of the best Fallout 4 mods for you to enjoy—and, once you have access to your system, download in your own home, for the best playthrough experience.

10 Best Fallout 4 Mods

1- SimpleSeasons

This mod will allow you to add a pop of color to a wasteland that would otherwise be, more or less, nothing except greys, yellows, and browns all the time. In other words, this mod—as the name suggests—will allow you to add the effect of seasons into the East-Coast Fallout landscape: you’ll see snow in winter, green plants in spring, orange and yellow leaves in summer, and leaves turning bright yellow on branches during the autumn mode.

The mod has four versions—one for each of the four seasons—and is available on PC, PS4 and Xbox One. You can download all of them if you like, or even just one, although the PC option is actually a four-in-one pack. It’s also worth noting that it’s one of the most visually enticing Fallout 4 PS4 mods.

2- Conquest

Camping has always been a fun feature in video games, whether you’re playing Final Fantasy XV or Monster Hunter—or, if you’re anything like me, camping out in the mines looking for gems during winter days in Harvest Moon 64. Nostalgia aside, you can now add camping to your Fallout 4 experience thanks to Chesko’s Conquest mod, which allows you to engage in this relaxing experience while healing and clearing unnecessary stuff from your inventory.

The Sole Survivor can even expand his or her campsite, thus turning it into a new settlement in its own right, which in turn will allow you to open up avenues for trade and city-building in the wasteland, like all the other settlements. You can also choose where these campsites are located, and can build ten in all, with the option of dismantling them.

3- Legendary Modification

 Legendary Modification is perhaps one of the best Fallout 4 mods, and with good reason: it basically gives you the ability to craft items with the attributes that are normally attached to legendary weapon or armor—in exchange, of course, for a significant material cost. The mod is able to do this because it adds a new modification slot to your options for crafting weapons and armor.

When creating your legendary item, you can choose from every attribute that is available in the game, effectively giving yourself powerful abilities that will make the rest of the game a little bit easier—and a lot more entertaining. Get on the next level with this revolutionary mod, and have fun experimenting with the full slew of different options.

As one of the Fallout 4 Xbox One mods, the mod is available on all systems: Xbox One, PS4, and PC. Note that it’s not compatible with other modded content, however.

4- Fusion City Rising

Are you done the game, but still hankering for some more Fallout 4? Well, in that case, this mod—developed by players Recluse and Thuggysmurf—functions basically like an expansion pack: it adds new locations, a good number of quests, and even some new factions. All of this takes place in Fusion City, which is found underground, and which takes the form of a subway system that’s simply enormous.

There are tons of vendors, and lots of entertainment to boot—a mall, shooting ranges, and even a new player home that you can use for yourself. How cool is that?

5- Armorsmith Extended

This mod will allow you to add a new Armorsmith crafting table to the game, with the result that you can both make and upgrade your clothes and armor.

It will also allow you to sport gas masks and bandanas under your hats. As a further result, all of the clothes and armor that have been upgraded thanks to the app will become more valuable, so you can get a better experience out of owning them—or sell them for more bottle caps and pre-war money. Not to mention, this mod is particularly well-liked in a game where the wardrobe is…shall we say, a little bit lacking.

The mod fixes this by allowing you to wear those combinations of armor that look amazing (or amazingly weird) and give you great stats boosts. You can basically wear any armor piece over your standard outfits. Now you can finally wear your Grognak the Barbarian outfit however you like.

The mod, one of many of the Fallout 4 Xbox One mods, is available for Xbox One and PC. While you can’t get it on a PS4, one mod with a similar purpose is the Unified Clothing Overhaul (as long as you’ve installed the Armor and Weapon Keywords Community Resource beforehand).

6- Lowered Weapons

Mods work like Google Chrome extensions: they contribute to getting rid of not only big-picture kinds of things but also those small, tiny annoyances that niggle at you as you use the game (or browser).

In the case of Fallout 4, there’s a clear annoyance that is very annoying, perhaps even more annoying than all the other small things in the game—namely, the fact that the Sole Survivor will continue to have his or her gun or weapon pointed at NPCs while they’re in conversation together. Not only is this irritating on principle (in the same way that it grates when sitcom characters invite guests over without closing their front door), but it’s also needlessly menacing, particularly from a character who is on a mission to save their only son.

Anyway, you can get rid of this issue with lesma666’s Lowered Weapons mod, which gives you the ability to (you guessed it) lower your weapon when you’re not in combat, thus clearing your interface a little. The mod can be downloaded to Fallout if you’re using a PC or Xbox One. Unfortunately, because it uses external assets, you can’t use the mod on PS4.

7- OCDecorator

This mod allows you to place items on top of items, so that placing things—whether weapons or armor—on top of shelves, or placing office fans on top of desks, is no longer a hassle to deal with. What all of this means is that your settlement will be tidy and neatly organized, structured however you like it to be structured, and the items won’t keep on getting knocked over (and landing into a pile on the floor) by NPCs who are passing through. This mod can be downloaded to the game on all three systems.

8- Better Settlers

 We’re all familiar with subpar AI in games, whether it’s from enemies or from NPCs. And in Fallout 4, there are less-than-intelligent NPCs aplenty…not exactly ideal when you’re trying to build the best possible shelter to get you through the wasteland. It’s hardly efficient, after all—not when NPCs keep getting in the way of what you’re doing. So, you can solve this problem with Better Settlers, a mode designed by user Thom293.

The mod allows two hundred and thirty new settlers to come with you at your shelter. Just about everything you do as a player in your shelter can affect them, their equipment (which, while fan-developed, is highly compatible with the lore of the game), their mortality rates, and their stats in general. And plus, not only are they well-designed (and perhaps more intelligent than Bethesda’s own NPC offerings), but it will be a great experience to not see the same faces day in, day out. As well, the mod is fully compatible with Sim Settlements, another high-quality settlement modé

9- True Storms

This mod, designed by user fadingsignal, will help you really feel the effects of a nuclear, post-apocalyptic wasteland, as opposed to just a regular old post-apocalyptic wasteland. In particular, the mod adds heavy fog, dust storms, radioactive rain, and other features to the barren landscape. This mod adds other immersive weather effects, too, including both fork and sheet lightning. There are also twenty different sound effects to represent the thunder banging forth up above in the sky. Plus, this mod will help sharpen and revitalize the textures and visuals of the game.

10- Sim Settlements

We already mentioned Sim Settlements before, and with good reason, in that kinggath’s mod is compatible with Better Settlers. But it’s also a very good mod in its own right, designed to alleviate the tedium and the monotony of building up multiple settlements in the way that’s built into the game. Instead, the mod allows the Sole Survivor to establish plots of land, which can have their modes set as being retail, agricultural or residential.

After the mode has been set, the settlers will arrive and begin building up their shelters, without you having to manually enter the commands to have the buildings constructed yourself. Because of this, Sim Settlements will also allow you to develop settlements that grow organically, while you have nothing to do except watch your settlements develop as you continue journeying throughout the game. You’ll still have to handle other needs yourself—including water, food and defense—but Sim Settlements does help relieve a lot of the trouble for you.

Fallout 4 mods: A must for fans everywhere

If you’re looking for Fallout 4 mods of any kind—including Fallout 4 PS4 mods and the ones for Xbox One and PC—then countless options are available to you. They will allow you to modify the game experience in all kinds of ways, including by updating graphics and textures, adding new NPCs, and even giving you new, fan-developed areas of the game to explore, with their own quests to beat (thereby adding another level of playthrough to the game, even after you’ve beaten everything else). All you need to do is find the mods that are compatible with your system(s) and choose the ones that appeal to you most. Neato burrito!

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10 Best Fallout 4 Mods for PS4 Xbox Game
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